5 Tips To Shortlist Content Creators 0 1392

You have done your research on influencers you would like to work with.

Then you have spent an astonishing amount of time reaching out to each individual, trying to build a rapport.

Now it is time to sign up the best content creators for your brand; however, what is the best way to select the ones that will bring higher exposure and ROI to your brand?

Watch out for the five tips below before signing the dotted line.

Engagement, not followers

Big numbers of people following an influencer only translates to business benefits if they have genuine engagement from those followers. Do not limit yourself to check the main platform for which you will hire the creator to collaborate on (for example, Instagram). Looking at how your future influencer posts over different outlets will help you to gather his/her strong and weak points as well as how good they are at engaging their followers.

Rates

Money talks.

Besides, it is 2019, no one is working for free to promote a brand.

Ask for a rate card or a breakdown of fees as soon as you start a conversation with a creator. Remember: time is valuable. It is best to know from day one, if you are able to afford that influencer that you see popping everywhere. While negotiating, try to put together a package; this moves the negotiations away from a single post that will bring you almost no results. Long term partnerships also will help to obtain more affordable rates from creators.

Very important: be cautious with influencers that don’t have a standard rate card or individuals who says that it ‘depends on the brand’. Creation is charged based on the amount of work involved, length of image usage and distribution (local versus global campaign, for example). Influencer’s’ rates should not be based on how much a client can afford, instead prices should reflect how much an influencer can bring to the table.

Versatility

You should definitely look for creators that have a hands-on approach to delivering content for you

Although sometimes is great to work with influencers so big that they can now afford to have an entire team producing on their behalf, at the end of the day, it is important to understand that with those ones, you are buying a media slot to tap into their audience built over years – not their exclusive creative mind.

Remember: creators that can deliver not only photos, but also high quality videos, IG stories, etc., will be a plus when negotiating a content package, as you won’t have to hire that service from a third party.

Affinity

No matter how cool the influencers in your shortlist look. At the end of the day it all comes down to delivering a service (content) and producing exposure to your brand (reach).

Nothing works better than collaborating with creators that genuinely like your product or service. Before signing a contract, check previous collaborations of your selected influencers (especially previous collaborations with your direct competitors, if any) and have an upfront conversation with the creator about what he/she already knows about your brand.

Delivery

This is an easy one to start checking from the initial contact.

If an influencer takes a long time to reply to a simple request regarding their fees and availability, chances are he/she isn’t available or willing to work with new clients.

I would recommend chasing up to a maximum of three times to get an answer and give up after that, moving forward to more reliable creators. Truth is: if a creator delays so much to reply to an email where you’re offering to pay them money for their services, you can probably imagine what a nightmare it will be to brief and wait for him/her to deliver the agreed assets for a campaign.

If you get a reply many weeks later, you can politely reply that ‘all the collaboration for this project have now been signed up and it won’t be possible to work together on this occasion.’

It goes without saying that the best tip to shortlist anyone to work with you is your own gut-feeling while looking for the right people to create content for and with you. If something doesn’t look or feel right at the very beginning or you are not sure if an influencer in your list is a right fit, it is always advisable to look for someone else.

Photo: Stephen Kennedy

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Marcio Delgado is a Journalist, speaker and a Content Producer working with brands and publications in the UK and Latin America.

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How to work with influencers in 2020 0 328

Estimated to be worth over of $8 billion by the end of this year – and forecast to surpass a wealthy $10 billion in 2020 – influencers marketing is set to become a fundamental feature of any brand’s marketing strategy looking to tap into a wider variety of social demographics through the use of content creators and their powerful online communities.

However, it has never been more difficult to navigate the sea of independent creators and companies offering automated influencers marketing solutions.

Regardless of the size, here are the key steps a brand should take to increase their chances of working effectively with influencers in 2020.

Define your goal

Influencers don’t own a magic lamp ready to make all your wishes come true – even the genie in Aladin’s tale didn’t grant more than three wishes for those rubbing the oil-lamp. Avoid audiences that are too generic and make it clear whether your campaign aim is to build your brand’s reputation, increase awareness towards a new product/service, acquire a new demographic of potential customers, get better customer engagement, increase your number of followers, or your number of sales. Importantly, you can’t have a campaign goal that involves all of these benefits, so choose smartly.

 

Set a realistic budget

Having a clear number in mind, before even reaching out to content creators, will help you when it comes to making decisions regarding how many influencers you will be able to bring on board. Preferably, you will be wanting a mix of micro-influencers and content creators with a larger number of followers. Don’t be afraid of negotiating fees, especially if your campaign will have a long run, but be realistic when putting aside money to cover your influencer marketing strategy and don’t treat it as simply an occasional top-up of traditional marketing spending.

 

Do your homework

Once you have a very clear idea of what you want to promote and how much you can spend on it, it is time to find potential collaborators. Influencer marketing platforms will try to sell you the idea that you can find all content creators in one place at a click of a button. Don’t be influenced by that naïve solution because, like most things in marketing, one size doesn’t fit all; even two companies with similar products and target audiences can have completely different successful strategies when it comes to working with influencers. Checking who is talking, online and offline, about topics that matter to your brand is more effective than looking for creators with large amounts of followers or perfectly curated grids. Use hashtags to track keywords that lead you to influencers that are a close fit to your business and don’t ignore your own social graph because:

One of your influencers could be amongst your own network of friends or employees;

They could be people that don’t label themselves as an ‘influencer’, nor spend most of their waking hours posting pictures of lattes or smashed avocado on toast, but who are able to create great imagery and to get friends talking about real-life content.

 

Go beyond the post

As someone that has always worked with images, firstly photography and then cinematic videos, I truly believe the saying: “A picture is worth a thousand words”. However, I also believe in thinking outside the box. Don’t limit your influencer collaboration to static posts. Tap into Instagram stories, get your creators to work on long-format content to be used as a blog entry, work with exclusive giveaways and promo codes, and always brainstorm with your influencers how your brand can creatively engage with their online communities.

Have a contract, not an agreement

You would be surprised by the number of companies that have a kind of ‘agreement’ between brands and content creators, instead of a contract binding both sides. They are not exactly the same. Agreements are often an arrangement reached between two or more parties (if a brand’s agency is involved, for example) and it usually features a lot of branding guidelines. A contract is a very specific type of document, legally binding and enforceable in a court of law, and where is featured how and where you will use content created by suppliers, as well for how long and any fees involved – a lot of brands miss out on this.

While hiring an influencer to help with your branding it is crucial that they grant you full content usage rights. This will be very handy when you decide to repurpose content into other forms of advertising like posts on other social media platforms, testimonials or ads, just to name a few, so you don’t have to go back and ask for the content creator’s permission over and over again.

 

Agree on clear deadlines

As well as communicating with influencers about the kind of content that you are expecting from them, you must give them very clear deadlines, including buffer time for reviews and amends. Keep in mind that content creators are independent professionals working with other brands, not only yours, so bring to the table at a very early stage of negotiations how long a creator will need to deliver a set of content. Sometimes, one of your favorite influencers will be busy or will require much longer to create desirable content than you can wait. In this instance, just let it go and move on to collaborators that can fit your deadline needs.

 

Measure, measure, measure

Although measuring is the last one listed here, it is something that needs to be discussed with your content creators during the hiring process, to make sure both sides are clear about how performance and success will be measured during and after your influencer marketing campaign. Engagement is likely to remain a strong measuring tool in 2020, but don’t ignore click-throughs, discount voucher redemptions, your own followers’ growth while partnering with a poll of influencers and, if you are lucky enough, you will even be able to track where some of the new sales are coming from.

Sustainable pee, influencers and politics at the Web Summit 0 273

“This is the very first time in my life that I am on the same stage as Wladimir Klitschko, Eric Catona and Ronaldinho. It is a privilege, but it could also be a risk.”

With light and pondering words, Michel Barnier, European Union’s Chief Negotiator for the United Kingdom exiting the European Union, opened his speech at the Web Summit on Tuesday (5), highlighting that to share the spotlight at the annual technology conference held in Lisbon with an Ukrainian boxer, a former French football player, and a former Brazilian football player, was anything but ordinary.

The unconventional nature of the attendees was not out of the ordinary, though. Now close to its 10th anniversary, the event which brings together Fortune 500 companies, ground-breaking start-ups and world-class speakers to Portugal, has been far from conventional since its first edition, held in Ireland in 2010, totaling a modest audience of only 400 people.

A decade later and the conference has grown from strength to strength.

This week the Web Summit welcomed over 70,000 attendees and 1,200 speakers, including top executives from companies such as Facebook, Uber, Shell, Fuji, Microsoft, Burger King, Volvo, BBC, Procter & Gamble, Google, Nokia, Philipps, Amazon. Not to mention, a representative from the American White House also attended.

This is the fourth year in which the event has been hosted in Portugal after leaving Ireland and, since then, the growth of the technology sector, coupled with the strength of start-ups, has led several European cities to show interest in hosting the event, including Valencia, which reportedly bid approximately € 170 million, in 2018, to become the event’s host for a decade. However, after negotiations with the Portuguese government, which pledged an annual budget of 11 million Euros to expand the arena hosting the event and the number of participants, the Web Summit has ended up staying in Lisbon.

Despite sporadic presentations that can sound more political than technological – such as Barnier’s one – the event firmly focused on what the future holds for companies and users, with brands such as Samsung considering how innovation will be part of our homes in 2025, Uber talking about its road ahead, BBC and Reuters TV debating if is there is a future for TV, and Amazon mapping the evolution from keyword searches to Artificial intelligence-enabled conversations.

New technology as a current topic also gave Facebook a chance to plug its virtual currency, Calibra; the audience, though, didn’t seem too keen to mix finance with social media in times of scandals involving social networks’ leaks and unauthorized sales of user data.

So, when it came to social media, activists and ‘The Vampire Diaries’ actor Ian Somerhalder, fared much better when talking about influence, building an online community and using social platforms such as Instagram and Facebook to engage followers with projects that can change the world.

Sustainable pee

Besides talks featuring world leaders, the WebSummit also hosted hundreds of start-ups from around the world exhibiting over five connected pavilions.

One of these companies was Piipee, which sells a biodegradable solution to replace the water which is used to flush after, you guessed it: peeing.

“It is an environmentally friendly option that works on the physical and chemical characteristics of urine, removing its odor, changing its color, odorizing and sanitizing the bathroom, all without using water. The idea came by chance in 2010 and, when I started to study the feasibility of this, I found studies showing that 80% of the water consumption of a toilet is only to eliminate urine. In São Paulo, for example, in Serra da Cantareira, one of the largest water treatment systems in Latin America, approximately 40% of this water is used for flushing toilets. These numbers caught my eye and I began to wonder if it really makes sense to treat water and then use it to flush toilets? – asks Ezequiel Vedana, the 31 years old Brazilian inventor of the eco-solution.

“It took five years before I could get the project off the ground because I don’t have a background in biochemistry; But I developed the idea, nevertheless. Being at the WebSummit is an opportunity to showcase ‘Piipee’ and to see what is new within the sustainable area across Europe and around the world. ”- celebrated Ezequiel

Although the product is still only available for sale through its own website, with the smallest spray bottle costing around $7 and lasting approximately 400 toilet flushes, Vedana is adamant that paying for a chemical additive, rather than simply flushing, is cheaper than the cost of water.

“Today our focus is on serving large companies, as it will take time for mass communities around the world to be fully aware of how important it is to save water. It takes a real change in culture and that change takes time because, for those who have access to it, water is relatively cheap. The product already makes sense in areas where there is a water shortage, as flushing a toilet consumes about 10 litres. However, even if it takes a few more years for people to use water wisely, the change has already started.”

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