How to work with influencers in 2020 0 266

Estimated to be worth over of $8 billion by the end of this year – and forecast to surpass a wealthy $10 billion in 2020 – influencers marketing is set to become a fundamental feature of any brand’s marketing strategy looking to tap into a wider variety of social demographics through the use of content creators and their powerful online communities.

However, it has never been more difficult to navigate the sea of independent creators and companies offering automated influencers marketing solutions.

Regardless of the size, here are the key steps a brand should take to increase their chances of working effectively with influencers in 2020.

Define your goal

Influencers don’t own a magic lamp ready to make all your wishes come true – even the genie in Aladin’s tale didn’t grant more than three wishes for those rubbing the oil-lamp. Avoid audiences that are too generic and make it clear whether your campaign aim is to build your brand’s reputation, increase awareness towards a new product/service, acquire a new demographic of potential customers, get better customer engagement, increase your number of followers, or your number of sales. Importantly, you can’t have a campaign goal that involves all of these benefits, so choose smartly.

 

Set a realistic budget

Having a clear number in mind, before even reaching out to content creators, will help you when it comes to making decisions regarding how many influencers you will be able to bring on board. Preferably, you will be wanting a mix of micro-influencers and content creators with a larger number of followers. Don’t be afraid of negotiating fees, especially if your campaign will have a long run, but be realistic when putting aside money to cover your influencer marketing strategy and don’t treat it as simply an occasional top-up of traditional marketing spending.

 

Do your homework

Once you have a very clear idea of what you want to promote and how much you can spend on it, it is time to find potential collaborators. Influencer marketing platforms will try to sell you the idea that you can find all content creators in one place at a click of a button. Don’t be influenced by that naïve solution because, like most things in marketing, one size doesn’t fit all; even two companies with similar products and target audiences can have completely different successful strategies when it comes to working with influencers. Checking who is talking, online and offline, about topics that matter to your brand is more effective than looking for creators with large amounts of followers or perfectly curated grids. Use hashtags to track keywords that lead you to influencers that are a close fit to your business and don’t ignore your own social graph because:

One of your influencers could be amongst your own network of friends or employees;

They could be people that don’t label themselves as an ‘influencer’, nor spend most of their waking hours posting pictures of lattes or smashed avocado on toast, but who are able to create great imagery and to get friends talking about real-life content.

 

Go beyond the post

As someone that has always worked with images, firstly photography and then cinematic videos, I truly believe the saying: “A picture is worth a thousand words”. However, I also believe in thinking outside the box. Don’t limit your influencer collaboration to static posts. Tap into Instagram stories, get your creators to work on long-format content to be used as a blog entry, work with exclusive giveaways and promo codes, and always brainstorm with your influencers how your brand can creatively engage with their online communities.

Have a contract, not an agreement

You would be surprised by the number of companies that have a kind of ‘agreement’ between brands and content creators, instead of a contract binding both sides. They are not exactly the same. Agreements are often an arrangement reached between two or more parties (if a brand’s agency is involved, for example) and it usually features a lot of branding guidelines. A contract is a very specific type of document, legally binding and enforceable in a court of law, and where is featured how and where you will use content created by suppliers, as well for how long and any fees involved – a lot of brands miss out on this.

While hiring an influencer to help with your branding it is crucial that they grant you full content usage rights. This will be very handy when you decide to repurpose content into other forms of advertising like posts on other social media platforms, testimonials or ads, just to name a few, so you don’t have to go back and ask for the content creator’s permission over and over again.

 

Agree on clear deadlines

As well as communicating with influencers about the kind of content that you are expecting from them, you must give them very clear deadlines, including buffer time for reviews and amends. Keep in mind that content creators are independent professionals working with other brands, not only yours, so bring to the table at a very early stage of negotiations how long a creator will need to deliver a set of content. Sometimes, one of your favorite influencers will be busy or will require much longer to create desirable content than you can wait. In this instance, just let it go and move on to collaborators that can fit your deadline needs.

 

Measure, measure, measure

Although measuring is the last one listed here, it is something that needs to be discussed with your content creators during the hiring process, to make sure both sides are clear about how performance and success will be measured during and after your influencer marketing campaign. Engagement is likely to remain a strong measuring tool in 2020, but don’t ignore click-throughs, discount voucher redemptions, your own followers’ growth while partnering with a poll of influencers and, if you are lucky enough, you will even be able to track where some of the new sales are coming from.

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Marcio Delgado is a Journalist, speaker and a Content Producer working with brands and publications in the UK and Latin America.

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Who are the top digital influencers in Britain in 2019? 0 9931

Being a reality star in Britain won’t help you gain influence. At least, not in accord to the list of Top 100 influencers, released this month by The Sunday Times, lacking modern celebrities whose newfound careers last merely as long as their reality shows are being aired. These findings are the case despite most of them trying hard to become social media influencers in order to extend their 15 minutes of fame.

The list, which includes young entrepreneur and lifestyle YouTuber Zoe Sugg in 53rd position and fitness coach and author Joe Wicks in 60th, was determined using an algorithm created by digital trends platform CORQ. This algorithm scored influencers based on audience size, growth and engagement rate, as well as their social activity over time.

Men took the top four of the content creator ranking spots with Youtuber PewDiePie, real name Felix Kjellberg (11M subscribers on YouTube and counting), being named the most influential digital star in Britain. Coming in at number five, lifestyle blogger Saffron Barker (2 million subscribers on YouTube) is the most influential woman on the list.

Influencers, bloggers and vloggers with a solid fan-base are now able to command five-figure sums in exchange for brand investments. Over recent years, influencer marketing has been on the rise, with the digital influence market forecasted to be worth £8bn by 2020.

The top 25 most influential digital stars in Britain are:

1: Felix Kjellberg

YouTube Channel: PewDiePie

Subscribers: 101, 039, 359

What he does: talks about gaming

 

2: Olajide William Olatunji

Subscribers: 7,395,610

What he does: Rapper and professional boxer.

 

3: Craig Thompson

Subscribers: 5,743,326

What he does: Gaming

 

4: Billy Wingrove and Jeremy Lynch

Subscribers:10,641,232

What they do: Football freestylers

 

5: Saffron Barker

Subscribers: 2,187,330

What she does: Lifestyle blogger

 

6: Joe Sugg

Subscribers: 3,662,907

What he does: Entertainment

 

7: Chelsea Clarke

Subscribers: 244,894

What she does: Beauty blogger

 

8: Callum Leighton Airey

Subscribers: 3,146,776

What he does: Gaming

 

9: Joshua Bradley

Subscribers: 2,102,975

What he does: Gaming

 

10: Colin Furze

Subscribers: 8,427,123

What he does: Entertainment

 

11: Alastair Alken

Subscribers: 16,520,959

What he does: Gaming

 

12: Patricia Bright

Subscribers: 2,804,914

What she does: Beauty blogger

 

13: The Saccone Jolys

Subscribers: 1,903,313

What they do: Family videos over 10 years

 

14: Theo Baker

Subscribers: 824,247

What he does: Football

 

15: Emmanuel John Brown

Subscribers: 1,557,521

What he does: Football

 

16: Jordan Lipscombe

Subscribers: 1,734,130

What she does: Beauty

17: Holly Boon

Subscribers: 675,374

What she does: Beauty

 

18: Gaz Oakley

Subscribers: 703,540

What he does: Vegan food content creator

 

19: Ling Khac Tang

Subscribers: 300,997

What she does: Beauty

 

20: Amelia Liana Sopher

Subscribers: 496,896

What she does: Lifestyle

 

21: Tamara Kalinic

Subscribers: 207,697

What she does: Beauty/Fashion

 

22: Safwan Ahmedmia

Subscribers: 1,377,673

What he does: Technology

 

23: Estee Lalonde

Subscribers: 1,174,388

What she does: Lifestyle vlogger

 

24: Sarah Turner

Subscribers: 885

What he does: Parenting content

 

25: The Ingham Family

Subscribers: 1,262,249

What they do: Parenting content

 

#InfluencerMarketing #topUKinfluencers #contentcreators #workingwithinfluencersq

What do influencers think about the new hiding likes Instagram trial? 0 1626

It is still relatively early to say how the Instagram ‘likes’ ban in selected countries will affect the number of people actually liking a piece of content posted by their favorite influencer.

While brands and content creators have attempted to adjust in countries like Canada, Italy, Brazil, New Zealand, and Japan, where the ban was introduced last month, there still remains a discussion surrounding the efficacy of this test being carried out by the Facebook-owned social platform. Ultimately, at this point in time, the potential positive outcomes of a more “healthy” environment and higher quality content are yet to be seen.

Here, content creators from different countries around the world share their views on how they see the latest Instagram decision having an impact.

It will change the way people use Instagram

“I think it’s a great initiative. Likes are causing anxiety amongst users and hiding them will change the way one uses Instagram. Content will be created for the content and not to get likes.”

Pooja Dhingra – Pastry chef. Founder and CEO @Le15India and author

Only good content will matter

“Definitely a good initiative because in a world where the number of likes proves a person’s popularity or not, there is a lot of competitiveness, depression and imposed standards. I think hiding likes will direct people towards paying a lot more interest to the content itself, and only those ones with good content will continue to influence people’s lives.”

Bruna Martimiano – Blogger and digital Influencer

There are two sides to it

“We see the good and bad side of it. The good: without the pressure of having really high engagement, creators will have more freedom of expression with the content that they’re making. Either they get more personal to connect with their audience more, or they create even more beautiful content to continue standing out. It can encourage newer creators, too, to create more as they would be judged by quality rather than likes.

However, the bad side of it is that this can be a move for the platform to control engagement more. If no one can see the likes, the algorithm can try to lessen exposure to content and they can prioritize content distributors that are spending more money (advertisers and promoters).

Ruben Arriba and Rachel Pregunta – Content creators and travel bloggers at @gamintraveler 

People will stop comparing themselves to others

“I believe it’s a good and a bad thing really depending on what way you look at it ?. It’s not really good for people that are promoters or influencers as they work with a lot of companies that send them clothing and other things because they have a really good following on their Instagram and get a lot of people liking their pictures, which means a lot of people see what they post and may potentially buy it. On the other hand, it’s good for people’s mental health as they can stop comparing themselves to others.”

Peter Hopkins – Footballer, Model, and Influencer

It may impact engagement

“I think it doesn’t necessarily impact the creator-brand endorsement relationship as creators will still be able to view likes on the back-end. However, not seeing a large number of likes may discourage others from liking a post, thus driving down that engagement.”

Goldie Chan – Founder and Keynote Speaker, Top Linkedin video creator

Instagram may lose identity

“Personally, I think there are pros and cons. For me, Instagram is about posting great and engaging content and it’s great to see public likes to know that your hard work is paying off and your audience engages with your content, and other people and brands can see this as well. However, on the flip side, I do have days where I wish likes weren’t a thing and that people were not so fixated on them, including myself because it does start to affect you mentally if a photo you post doesn’t match your expectations of how many likes you think it should get. But, somehow, I feel that if likes disappear from Instagram, altogether, then Instagram itself will lose its identity.”

Murray Davies – Content creator | London

There is more to life than Instagram likes

“In my point of view, it will make social media more enjoyable; people are going to be seen more as human beings and not simply as numbers. It’s also going to be good to finally be able to post our daily content without expecting numbers! At the end of the day, life is so much more than this!” ?

Keu Bastos – Content creator – Ireland

They are destroying Instagram

“I’m not impressed with what they have been doing to Instagram. I actually messaged them just to say it before they destroy it even more than they already have. I don’t like it at all, as my last photo had less than half of the likes it would usually get, so fewer people are now seeing it with the algorithm. It makes difficult now to tell what accounts are genuine because previously most accounts that had lots of followers you could just look at their engagement – including likes – and almost tell if they bought likes. The new ban on likes has just started, so it is still early to say how it will affect in the long run. As other people won’t be able to see the likes someone else’s post gets, maybe it would be the case if we all start commenting “like” on the pictures as a way to fight back?”

Utah Jack – Photographer

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