Scam of Instagram verification sales 0 1544

Have you ever taken some time to read some of the comments made under a post by your favourite influencer and saw messages left by people offering services such as ‘Get your Instagram account verified’?

They are scams, even if the accounts leaving those messages are verified accounts promising that they are an agency and, as a such, they have access to a ‘media partner’ panel to instantly verify Instagram accounts with no need for documents, nor passwords.

Save your time and money because, if you want a blue tick shining on your Instagram account to give you credibility, these services aren’t the ones that will make your dream come true.

How they do it:

The ‘real’ account: scammers hack into genuinely certified accounts (with the blue tick), steal their passwords and change the ‘handle’. There are hundreds of thousands of accounts that were genuinely certified by Instagram when it first began, over a decade ago, and lots of them are not in use, so hackers take advantage of those ‘ghost’ good accounts.

The outreach: there are paid ads on Google and posts on Instagram itself, but the preferred method for scammers to sell their fake verification service is to DM accounts with 10k+ followers, as well as using the comments section of big accounts (300k+) to lure people to their Instagram accounts for more details.

The payment: the available method to pay for the verification, which you will ultimately never receive, is through wire transfer services which don’t offer a money refund guarantee such as Zelle, Chase and Bitcoin, to name a few. Payment is expected in full and in advance. Don’t even try.

What to do:

If approached by someone trying to sell an Instagram Verification Service, report the account. It is likely Instagram will take months to do something, but eventually they delete accounts breaching its Terms and Conditions.

How to get verified:

It is free for those ones whom qualify – and simply non-existent for the rest of accounts which Instagram doesn’t feel deserving of being verified. It isn’t just beautiful content that makes you eligible, sorry to burst your bubble.

However, if you think your account qualifies to be verified, here is how to request that:

  1. Make sure you’re logged in to the account you’re requesting a verified badge for.
  2. Go to your profile and tap .
  3. Tap Settings > Account > Request Verification.
  4. Enter your full name and provide the required form of identification (example: government-issued photo ID).

As Instagram acknowledges, within its terms and conditions for verification requests, even if your account is eligible for verification, submitting a request doesn’t guarantee that your account will be verified.

So, keep in mind that, with over 1 billion monthly active users around the globe, you are more likely to be hit by a meteor than getting a positive response from Instagram. Good luck!

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Marcio Delgado is a Journalist, speaker and a Content Producer working with brands and publications in the UK and Latin America.

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How can Influencers bounce back from a bad reputation they have recently gained? 0 275

Running for its third consecutive year, the Influencer Marketing Show has just wrapped up its two-day show in London, gathering a wide range of agencies, brands and content creators under the same roof.

At a period of time when 86% of people surveyed for a 2019 benchmark report (including brand managers and marketing agency professionals) admit they plan to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars on influencers this year, it was no surprise that the recurrent topics evolved around influencer marketing transparency, specifically, considering how to best measure it based on recent cases of brands paying influencers to, unfortunately, get mainly ghost followers and fake engagement rates in return.

So, how can the real content creators, the ones that are working up to 12 hours a day to balance their clients’ demands and to produce genuine followers’ engagement, stand out when it comes to effective influencer marketing? Here, professionals share their views and tips.

Strategically work instead of work being simply transactional

“It is about encouraging influencers to be as transparent as possible, being totally open about what they can offer, about their KPIs. Influencers sometimes don’t want to connect their insights or disclose the full picture of their metrics. And, when it happens, this always elicits the question: Is there something that they are trying to hide?

Besides transparency, I believe that as we move towards 2020, it is about influencers and advertisers learning to work strategically, instead of transactionally. Content marketing is often very transactional, but influencer marketing goes beyond it.

Kim Westwood – founder of content market place Shoplinks.

Influencers should have a story

“I think it is all about storytelling. I always engage with people and talk about my own experiences. I think, first of all, you have to have a relevant story to subsequently be an influencer. You can’t be an influencer just by posting pictures of your outfits or pushing for consumerism, for people to buy something. Influencerism is more than that. It is about inspiring people, it is about having a story that matters and being able to answer questions like ‘Why are you doing what you do online?’, ‘How do you better yourself’? From the brand side, the company also have to always ask the right questions, starting from: ‘what do we really want to achieve with that campaign?’ ‘Does the influencer that we have in mind have a story that matches the direction that our brand wants to go?’, or ‘Does the influencer have the right demographic to help towards our campaign goals?’ Once these key questions are clearly outlined, it is easy to take it from there and to build a successful case for the right collaborations.

Arooj Aftab – Fashion Influencer and neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) advocate.

Get into a co-creation mode

“What we have seen a lot, from the influencer side, is their disregard for brand guidelines as a trade-off for favouring their aesthetic – they want to do their own content the way they always do it even when it is a paid piece. Of course, it is very important to let content creators express themselves freely because they know how to speak to their audiences but, on the other hand, if they are getting paid to communicate on behalf of a brand there is a need to get the right balance between money and creativity. If this balance is not established early on, then it can become problematic further down the line. What I recommend influencers to do is to get, from the very beginning, into a co-creation process, not just created in their own corner in an isolated manner. The very same thing applies to brands and their marketing agencies: don’t try to just impose your vision because collaborative content creation will thrive.”

William Soulier – CEO at influencer marketing platform Talent Village.

Who are the top digital influencers in Britain in 2019? 0 9931

Being a reality star in Britain won’t help you gain influence. At least, not in accord to the list of Top 100 influencers, released this month by The Sunday Times, lacking modern celebrities whose newfound careers last merely as long as their reality shows are being aired. These findings are the case despite most of them trying hard to become social media influencers in order to extend their 15 minutes of fame.

The list, which includes young entrepreneur and lifestyle YouTuber Zoe Sugg in 53rd position and fitness coach and author Joe Wicks in 60th, was determined using an algorithm created by digital trends platform CORQ. This algorithm scored influencers based on audience size, growth and engagement rate, as well as their social activity over time.

Men took the top four of the content creator ranking spots with Youtuber PewDiePie, real name Felix Kjellberg (11M subscribers on YouTube and counting), being named the most influential digital star in Britain. Coming in at number five, lifestyle blogger Saffron Barker (2 million subscribers on YouTube) is the most influential woman on the list.

Influencers, bloggers and vloggers with a solid fan-base are now able to command five-figure sums in exchange for brand investments. Over recent years, influencer marketing has been on the rise, with the digital influence market forecasted to be worth £8bn by 2020.

The top 25 most influential digital stars in Britain are:

1: Felix Kjellberg

YouTube Channel: PewDiePie

Subscribers: 101, 039, 359

What he does: talks about gaming

 

2: Olajide William Olatunji

Subscribers: 7,395,610

What he does: Rapper and professional boxer.

 

3: Craig Thompson

Subscribers: 5,743,326

What he does: Gaming

 

4: Billy Wingrove and Jeremy Lynch

Subscribers:10,641,232

What they do: Football freestylers

 

5: Saffron Barker

Subscribers: 2,187,330

What she does: Lifestyle blogger

 

6: Joe Sugg

Subscribers: 3,662,907

What he does: Entertainment

 

7: Chelsea Clarke

Subscribers: 244,894

What she does: Beauty blogger

 

8: Callum Leighton Airey

Subscribers: 3,146,776

What he does: Gaming

 

9: Joshua Bradley

Subscribers: 2,102,975

What he does: Gaming

 

10: Colin Furze

Subscribers: 8,427,123

What he does: Entertainment

 

11: Alastair Alken

Subscribers: 16,520,959

What he does: Gaming

 

12: Patricia Bright

Subscribers: 2,804,914

What she does: Beauty blogger

 

13: The Saccone Jolys

Subscribers: 1,903,313

What they do: Family videos over 10 years

 

14: Theo Baker

Subscribers: 824,247

What he does: Football

 

15: Emmanuel John Brown

Subscribers: 1,557,521

What he does: Football

 

16: Jordan Lipscombe

Subscribers: 1,734,130

What she does: Beauty

17: Holly Boon

Subscribers: 675,374

What she does: Beauty

 

18: Gaz Oakley

Subscribers: 703,540

What he does: Vegan food content creator

 

19: Ling Khac Tang

Subscribers: 300,997

What she does: Beauty

 

20: Amelia Liana Sopher

Subscribers: 496,896

What she does: Lifestyle

 

21: Tamara Kalinic

Subscribers: 207,697

What she does: Beauty/Fashion

 

22: Safwan Ahmedmia

Subscribers: 1,377,673

What he does: Technology

 

23: Estee Lalonde

Subscribers: 1,174,388

What she does: Lifestyle vlogger

 

24: Sarah Turner

Subscribers: 885

What he does: Parenting content

 

25: The Ingham Family

Subscribers: 1,262,249

What they do: Parenting content

 

#InfluencerMarketing #topUKinfluencers #contentcreators #workingwithinfluencersq

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