What do influencers think about the new hiding likes Instagram trial? 0 344

It is still relatively early to say how the Instagram ‘likes’ ban in selected countries will affect the number of people actually liking a piece of content posted by their favorite influencer.

While brands and content creators have attempted to adjust in countries like Canada, Italy, Brazil, New Zealand, and Japan, where the ban was introduced last month, there still remains a discussion surrounding the efficacy of this test being carried out by the Facebook-owned social platform. Ultimately, at this point in time, the potential positive outcomes of a more “healthy” environment and higher quality content are yet to be seen.

Here, content creators from different countries around the world share their views on how they see the latest Instagram decision having an impact.

It will change the way people use Instagram

“I think it’s a great initiative. Likes are causing anxiety amongst users and hiding them will change the way one uses Instagram. Content will be created for the content and not to get likes.”

Pooja Dhingra – Pastry chef. Founder and CEO @Le15India and author

Only good content will matter

“Definitely a good initiative because in a world where the number of likes proves a person’s popularity or not, there is a lot of competitiveness, depression and imposed standards. I think hiding likes will direct people towards paying a lot more interest to the content itself, and only those ones with good content will continue to influence people’s lives.”

Bruna Martimiano – Blogger and digital Influencer

There are two sides to it

“We see the good and bad side of it. The good: without the pressure of having really high engagement, creators will have more freedom of expression with the content that they’re making. Either they get more personal to connect with their audience more, or they create even more beautiful content to continue standing out. It can encourage newer creators, too, to create more as they would be judged by quality rather than likes.

However, the bad side of it is that this can be a move for the platform to control engagement more. If no one can see the likes, the algorithm can try to lessen exposure to content and they can prioritize content distributors that are spending more money (advertisers and promoters).

Ruben Arriba and Rachel Pregunta – Content creators and travel bloggers at @gamintraveler 

People will stop comparing themselves to others

“I believe it’s a good and a bad thing really depending on what way you look at it 💯. It’s not really good for people that are promoters or influencers as they work with a lot of companies that send them clothing and other things because they have a really good following on their Instagram and get a lot of people liking their pictures, which means a lot of people see what they post and may potentially buy it. On the other hand, it’s good for people’s mental health as they can stop comparing themselves to others.”

Peter Hopkins – Footballer, Model, and Influencer

It may impact engagement

“I think it doesn’t necessarily impact the creator-brand endorsement relationship as creators will still be able to view likes on the back-end. However, not seeing a large number of likes may discourage others from liking a post, thus driving down that engagement.”

Goldie Chan – Founder and Keynote Speaker, Top Linkedin video creator

Instagram may lose identity

“Personally, I think there are pros and cons. For me, Instagram is about posting great and engaging content and it’s great to see public likes to know that your hard work is paying off and your audience engages with your content, and other people and brands can see this as well. However, on the flip side, I do have days where I wish likes weren’t a thing and that people were not so fixated on them, including myself because it does start to affect you mentally if a photo you post doesn’t match your expectations of how many likes you think it should get. But, somehow, I feel that if likes disappear from Instagram, altogether, then Instagram itself will lose its identity.”

Murray Davies – Content creator | London

There is more to life than Instagram likes

“In my point of view, it will make social media more enjoyable; people are going to be seen more as human beings and not simply as numbers. It’s also going to be good to finally be able to post our daily content without expecting numbers! At the end of the day, life is so much more than this!” 🙂

Keu Bastos – Content creator – Ireland

They are destroying Instagram

“I’m not impressed with what they have been doing to Instagram. I actually messaged them just to say it before they destroy it even more than they already have. I don’t like it at all, as my last photo had less than half of the likes it would usually get, so fewer people are now seeing it with the algorithm. It makes difficult now to tell what accounts are genuine because previously most accounts that had lots of followers you could just look at their engagement – including likes – and almost tell if they bought likes. The new ban on likes has just started, so it is still early to say how it will affect in the long run. As other people won’t be able to see the likes someone else’s post gets, maybe it would be the case if we all start commenting “like” on the pictures as a way to fight back?”

Utah Jack – Photographer

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Marcio Delgado is a Journalist, speaker and a Content Producer working with brands and publications in the UK and Latin America.

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Influencer outreach best practices 0 242

Influencer outreach with results

It is 2019 and, although we live in an automated era, with bots everywhere, automation is not the optimal approach to outreach to great influencers to work with you. And I can say it by experience, having exchanged messages and contracts with hundreds of content creators over the past years that the best influencers are hard to get on board, as they are likely to be in demand, so a personalised touch is extremely important.

Sharing here a short summary of five steps I have learnt while working with influencers:

Be direct

Pay real attention to the length of your email. Content creators are always on the go, which means that they do not always have enough time to read very long messages and not always a good enough internet connection to spend much time online. Less is more.

Personalize

If you are not sure about the name of the influencer you want to connect to, don’t even bother sending an email until you find out. Do your research on through LinkedIn, Google, Facebook. Ask around. However, you should never send an email starting with “Dear Sir….” Because even amateurs scammers are doing a better job than this.

Send samples

If your campaign is already at a stage that you can disclose samples of what you have in mind, it will help enormously. Not only will this allow the content creator to be able to give you a more accurate reply and quote, but also, it will also set much clearer expectations, for both sides.

Show knowledge about their work

You are more likely to successfully hire the influencer you want to work with by talking about what they are doing right and why their work fits yours brand. Sending them a very long email about how amazing your company is won’t cut it. Stay clear from stupid questions such as ‘What is the main field you write about…?’. If you don’t know the answer to that question, you haven’t done your homework properly.

Talk cash

You would be surprised about the number of companies and agencies spamming influencers with invites for them to create content for free or in exchange for a very little reward. By making clear that you don’t expect them to help you for free, you are already ahead of the game. You don’t have to disclose exact amounts when initially contacting a potential collaborator, but you will have better results making clear that it is a paid collaboration.

 

Photo: Sedat Cakir

 

5 tips to work with Influencers 0 722

1. Long-term relationships are key

Forget the one post campaign. Social media is about an ongoing conversation and it includes working with creators on a regular basis, making it a successful partnership for both parties, the brand and the influencer. Ultimately, long-term relationships will also speed up the creative process over time, as you won’t have to go over your 186-page brand guidelines every time you brief a request to create a new batch of posts.

2. Avoid re-work

Be very clear and thorough when it comes to briefing the influencers, specially if it is someone new you are working with, or if you are briefing a completely new campaign for regular creators. Keep in mind that, more often than not, the same poll of influencers working with you will also be delivering content to other brands. Having to re-shoot or re-write pieces can cause massive delays for brands and content creators so there is no such thing as being too thorough. From my own experience, all the occasions in which I have had to request someone to amend content already delivered within the agreed brand guidelines it was because the new request was not very clear. Unless your briefing (and brand) allow total creative freedom for the influencer, make sure you don’t leave room for double interpretation.

3. Have well crafted contracts

Contracts exist for a reason: it is a black and white guideline between brands and creators, so make sure that you add every small detail to it. It is not about lengthy small prints that no one will care to read. It is about starting right, in the first place, then upon the eventuality that a brand and an influencer needs to go separate ways, it should be a seamless amicable process.

Important: if using a template that you found online, make sure to completely tailor it towards your brand, your campaign and each influencer you are working with. No template fits all.

4. Keep in touch

Good content takes time to be created. But sometimes, in between briefings, there are silent gaps when agencies, brands and influencers are not required to be in contact. Use this downtime to keep in touch with your collaborators to find out what they are up to and always leave an open door for influencers to suggest new things or new way to approach old topics. They know their audience. Your job is to find the best way to tap into it, together.

5. Share performance and success

Assuming you are doing all the previous things correctly, you will have plenty of reasons to celebrate the success of your new campaign. Also share the metrics: Did a post perform extremely well? Let the influencer know. The same applies for the opposite: if content is really lacking behind you have to let the creator knows about it and, together, you can fine tune it for better results.

 

Marcio Delgado is a Digital Influencer Manager and Global Content Producer of the award-winning series #LiveMoreShareMore powered by Western Union.

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