Who are the top digital influencers in Britain in 2019? 0 6757

Being a reality star in Britain won’t help you gain influence. At least, not in accord to the list of Top 100 influencers, released this month by The Sunday Times, lacking modern celebrities whose newfound careers last merely as long as their reality shows are being aired. These findings are the case despite most of them trying hard to become social media influencers in order to extend their 15 minutes of fame.

The list, which includes young entrepreneur and lifestyle YouTuber Zoe Sugg in 53rd position and fitness coach and author Joe Wicks in 60th, was determined using an algorithm created by digital trends platform CORQ. This algorithm scored influencers based on audience size, growth and engagement rate, as well as their social activity over time.

Men took the top four of the content creator ranking spots with Youtuber PewDiePie, real name Felix Kjellberg (11M subscribers on YouTube and counting), being named the most influential digital star in Britain. Coming in at number five, lifestyle blogger Saffron Barker (2 million subscribers on YouTube) is the most influential woman on the list.

Influencers, bloggers and vloggers with a solid fan-base are now able to command five-figure sums in exchange for brand investments. Over recent years, influencer marketing has been on the rise, with the digital influence market forecasted to be worth £8bn by 2020.

The top 25 most influential digital stars in Britain are:

1: Felix Kjellberg

YouTube Channel: PewDiePie

Subscribers: 101, 039, 359

What he does: talks about gaming

 

2: Olajide William Olatunji

Subscribers: 7,395,610

What he does: Rapper and professional boxer.

 

3: Craig Thompson

Subscribers: 5,743,326

What he does: Gaming

 

4: Billy Wingrove and Jeremy Lynch

Subscribers:10,641,232

What they do: Football freestylers

 

5: Saffron Barker

Subscribers: 2,187,330

What she does: Lifestyle blogger

 

6: Joe Sugg

Subscribers: 3,662,907

What he does: Entertainment

 

7: Chelsea Clarke

Subscribers: 244,894

What she does: Beauty blogger

 

8: Callum Leighton Airey

Subscribers: 3,146,776

What he does: Gaming

 

9: Joshua Bradley

Subscribers: 2,102,975

What he does: Gaming

 

10: Colin Furze

Subscribers: 8,427,123

What he does: Entertainment

 

11: Alastair Alken

Subscribers: 16,520,959

What he does: Gaming

 

12: Patricia Bright

Subscribers: 2,804,914

What she does: Beauty blogger

 

13: The Saccone Jolys

Subscribers: 1,903,313

What they do: Family videos over 10 years

 

14: Theo Baker

Subscribers: 824,247

What he does: Football

 

15: Emmanuel John Brown

Subscribers: 1,557,521

What he does: Football

 

16: Jordan Lipscombe

Subscribers: 1,734,130

What she does: Beauty

17: Holly Boon

Subscribers: 675,374

What she does: Beauty

 

18: Gaz Oakley

Subscribers: 703,540

What he does: Vegan food content creator

 

19: Ling Khac Tang

Subscribers: 300,997

What she does: Beauty

 

20: Amelia Liana Sopher

Subscribers: 496,896

What she does: Lifestyle

 

21: Tamara Kalinic

Subscribers: 207,697

What she does: Beauty/Fashion

 

22: Safwan Ahmedmia

Subscribers: 1,377,673

What he does: Technology

 

23: Estee Lalonde

Subscribers: 1,174,388

What she does: Lifestyle vlogger

 

24: Sarah Turner

Subscribers: 885

What he does: Parenting content

 

25: The Ingham Family

Subscribers: 1,262,249

What they do: Parenting content

 

#InfluencerMarketing #topUKinfluencers #contentcreators #workingwithinfluencersq

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Marcio Delgado is a Journalist, speaker and a Content Producer working with brands and publications in the UK and Latin America.

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5 Tips To Shortlist Content Creators 0 1140

You have done your research on influencers you would like to work with.

Then you have spent an astonishing amount of time reaching out to each individual, trying to build a rapport.

Now it is time to sign up the best content creators for your brand; however, what is the best way to select the ones that will bring higher exposure and ROI to your brand?

Watch out for the five tips below before signing the dotted line.

Engagement, not followers

Big numbers of people following an influencer only translates to business benefits if they have genuine engagement from those followers. Do not limit yourself to check the main platform for which you will hire the creator to collaborate on (for example, Instagram). Looking at how your future influencer posts over different outlets will help you to gather his/her strong and weak points as well as how good they are at engaging their followers.

Rates

Money talks.

Besides, it is 2019, no one is working for free to promote a brand.

Ask for a rate card or a breakdown of fees as soon as you start a conversation with a creator. Remember: time is valuable. It is best to know from day one, if you are able to afford that influencer that you see popping everywhere. While negotiating, try to put together a package; this moves the negotiations away from a single post that will bring you almost no results. Long term partnerships also will help to obtain more affordable rates from creators.

Very important: be cautious with influencers that don’t have a standard rate card or individuals who says that it ‘depends on the brand’. Creation is charged based on the amount of work involved, length of image usage and distribution (local versus global campaign, for example). Influencer’s’ rates should not be based on how much a client can afford, instead prices should reflect how much an influencer can bring to the table.

Versatility

You should definitely look for creators that have a hands-on approach to delivering content for you

Although sometimes is great to work with influencers so big that they can now afford to have an entire team producing on their behalf, at the end of the day, it is important to understand that with those ones, you are buying a media slot to tap into their audience built over years – not their exclusive creative mind.

Remember: creators that can deliver not only photos, but also high quality videos, IG stories, etc., will be a plus when negotiating a content package, as you won’t have to hire that service from a third party.

Affinity

No matter how cool the influencers in your shortlist look. At the end of the day it all comes down to delivering a service (content) and producing exposure to your brand (reach).

Nothing works better than collaborating with creators that genuinely like your product or service. Before signing a contract, check previous collaborations of your selected influencers (especially previous collaborations with your direct competitors, if any) and have an upfront conversation with the creator about what he/she already knows about your brand.

Delivery

This is an easy one to start checking from the initial contact.

If an influencer takes a long time to reply to a simple request regarding their fees and availability, chances are he/she isn’t available or willing to work with new clients.

I would recommend chasing up to a maximum of three times to get an answer and give up after that, moving forward to more reliable creators. Truth is: if a creator delays so much to reply to an email where you’re offering to pay them money for their services, you can probably imagine what a nightmare it will be to brief and wait for him/her to deliver the agreed assets for a campaign.

If you get a reply many weeks later, you can politely reply that ‘all the collaboration for this project have now been signed up and it won’t be possible to work together on this occasion.’

It goes without saying that the best tip to shortlist anyone to work with you is your own gut-feeling while looking for the right people to create content for and with you. If something doesn’t look or feel right at the very beginning or you are not sure if an influencer in your list is a right fit, it is always advisable to look for someone else.

Photo: Stephen Kennedy

Influencer outreach best practices 0 287

Influencer outreach with results

It is 2019 and, although we live in an automated era, with bots everywhere, automation is not the optimal approach to outreach to great influencers to work with you. And I can say it by experience, having exchanged messages and contracts with hundreds of content creators over the past years that the best influencers are hard to get on board, as they are likely to be in demand, so a personalised touch is extremely important.

Sharing here a short summary of five steps I have learnt while working with influencers:

Be direct

Pay real attention to the length of your email. Content creators are always on the go, which means that they do not always have enough time to read very long messages and not always a good enough internet connection to spend much time online. Less is more.

Personalize

If you are not sure about the name of the influencer you want to connect to, don’t even bother sending an email until you find out. Do your research on through LinkedIn, Google, Facebook. Ask around. However, you should never send an email starting with “Dear Sir….” Because even amateurs scammers are doing a better job than this.

Send samples

If your campaign is already at a stage that you can disclose samples of what you have in mind, it will help enormously. Not only will this allow the content creator to be able to give you a more accurate reply and quote, but also, it will also set much clearer expectations, for both sides.

Show knowledge about their work

You are more likely to successfully hire the influencer you want to work with by talking about what they are doing right and why their work fits yours brand. Sending them a very long email about how amazing your company is won’t cut it. Stay clear from stupid questions such as ‘What is the main field you write about…?’. If you don’t know the answer to that question, you haven’t done your homework properly.

Talk cash

You would be surprised about the number of companies and agencies spamming influencers with invites for them to create content for free or in exchange for a very little reward. By making clear that you don’t expect them to help you for free, you are already ahead of the game. You don’t have to disclose exact amounts when initially contacting a potential collaborator, but you will have better results making clear that it is a paid collaboration.

 

Photo: Sedat Cakir

 

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