Who are the top digital influencers in Britain in 2019? 0 9702

Being a reality star in Britain won’t help you gain influence. At least, not in accord to the list of Top 100 influencers, released this month by The Sunday Times, lacking modern celebrities whose newfound careers last merely as long as their reality shows are being aired. These findings are the case despite most of them trying hard to become social media influencers in order to extend their 15 minutes of fame.

The list, which includes young entrepreneur and lifestyle YouTuber Zoe Sugg in 53rd position and fitness coach and author Joe Wicks in 60th, was determined using an algorithm created by digital trends platform CORQ. This algorithm scored influencers based on audience size, growth and engagement rate, as well as their social activity over time.

Men took the top four of the content creator ranking spots with Youtuber PewDiePie, real name Felix Kjellberg (11M subscribers on YouTube and counting), being named the most influential digital star in Britain. Coming in at number five, lifestyle blogger Saffron Barker (2 million subscribers on YouTube) is the most influential woman on the list.

Influencers, bloggers and vloggers with a solid fan-base are now able to command five-figure sums in exchange for brand investments. Over recent years, influencer marketing has been on the rise, with the digital influence market forecasted to be worth £8bn by 2020.

The top 25 most influential digital stars in Britain are:

1: Felix Kjellberg

YouTube Channel: PewDiePie

Subscribers: 101, 039, 359

What he does: talks about gaming

 

2: Olajide William Olatunji

Subscribers: 7,395,610

What he does: Rapper and professional boxer.

 

3: Craig Thompson

Subscribers: 5,743,326

What he does: Gaming

 

4: Billy Wingrove and Jeremy Lynch

Subscribers:10,641,232

What they do: Football freestylers

 

5: Saffron Barker

Subscribers: 2,187,330

What she does: Lifestyle blogger

 

6: Joe Sugg

Subscribers: 3,662,907

What he does: Entertainment

 

7: Chelsea Clarke

Subscribers: 244,894

What she does: Beauty blogger

 

8: Callum Leighton Airey

Subscribers: 3,146,776

What he does: Gaming

 

9: Joshua Bradley

Subscribers: 2,102,975

What he does: Gaming

 

10: Colin Furze

Subscribers: 8,427,123

What he does: Entertainment

 

11: Alastair Alken

Subscribers: 16,520,959

What he does: Gaming

 

12: Patricia Bright

Subscribers: 2,804,914

What she does: Beauty blogger

 

13: The Saccone Jolys

Subscribers: 1,903,313

What they do: Family videos over 10 years

 

14: Theo Baker

Subscribers: 824,247

What he does: Football

 

15: Emmanuel John Brown

Subscribers: 1,557,521

What he does: Football

 

16: Jordan Lipscombe

Subscribers: 1,734,130

What she does: Beauty

17: Holly Boon

Subscribers: 675,374

What she does: Beauty

 

18: Gaz Oakley

Subscribers: 703,540

What he does: Vegan food content creator

 

19: Ling Khac Tang

Subscribers: 300,997

What she does: Beauty

 

20: Amelia Liana Sopher

Subscribers: 496,896

What she does: Lifestyle

 

21: Tamara Kalinic

Subscribers: 207,697

What she does: Beauty/Fashion

 

22: Safwan Ahmedmia

Subscribers: 1,377,673

What he does: Technology

 

23: Estee Lalonde

Subscribers: 1,174,388

What she does: Lifestyle vlogger

 

24: Sarah Turner

Subscribers: 885

What he does: Parenting content

 

25: The Ingham Family

Subscribers: 1,262,249

What they do: Parenting content

 

#InfluencerMarketing #topUKinfluencers #contentcreators #workingwithinfluencersq

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Marcio Delgado is a Journalist, speaker and a Content Producer working with brands and publications in the UK and Latin America.

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How to switch off from social media when your job is to be switched on? 0 2767

When was the last time you heard that, if you truly care about your mental health, you should stay off social media? With Instagram alone commanding 1 Billion users per month, it is easier said than done, of course. And for some people, like content creators, journalists, and digital campaign managers, being ‘in the loop’ is an extension of their daily jobs – even over the weekends – and we all have bills to pay, one way or another.

Take Instagram, for example. Since its launch in 2010 its picture-perfect grids have been linked to anxiety and depression, and the popularity of social networks, as a whole, have been questioned even by those that have a digital DNA. Last year a study conducted by marketing agency Hill Holiday found that 41% of generation Z, the most socially savvy generation made of those born in 1994 and later, were quitting major social media platforms because it is actually making them unhappy.

As a journalist and content creator myself, I have been working with brands and publicationsfor a while now and I have seen how unbalanced that relationship with social media can be. So, I went out there and asked professionals who make a living from being constantly connected and informed, how they find the balance between the content-thirsty online world and staying sane –  and how they manage to, eventually, switch off.

Get yourself organized

“I switch off by setting limits around how much time I am going to spend on my phone. That is not just for social media, but technology in general. I haven’t mindlessly scrolled in a while and I actually rarely engage with people’s accounts or follow them unless they are my closest friends. And yes, there have been times where it has been too much and I have forgotten to prioritize my mental health. That being said, I think social media has the potential to be an amazing platform to learn, to get information and be connected/inspired in ways I could not otherwise. I lacked role models growing up and many of the individuals I follow on social media have significantly impacted my life for the better. The key is just being mindful and aware of HOW and WHAT you engage with. I also switch off from social media and instead connect with REAL people; this will always be better than any online presence.

From a content creator’s perspective, the best thing to avoid social media burnout is to be efficient and produce many photos ahead of time, including shooting and editing, so that you don’t feel under pressure. I always have 25+ photos ready to go as backups so that way I can take breaks and still maintain a consistent presence on social media.”

Caleb Spiro – Influencer, Mental health advocate and creator of the #StrongerSelf podcast

Say bye to notifications

“I found myself getting too caught up in the numbers of likes, numbers, and followers. So sometimes I do take a little break. Right now, I’m not on Instagram too much on Fridays and Saturdays and I think a lot of people are starting to do the same! The weekend is usually centered around family and friends, so I want to be present rather than just staring at a screen. Of course, I have met so many wonderful people online and I love talking to them through IG — it can be such a great source to connect with like-minded people. However, you have to find that balance if you are finding yourself checking your notifications in your real-time.”

I switch off from social media by not allowing notifications to show on my phone — from Instagram to Facebook (which I actually deleted), and recently my email too! I used to have them on because I always felt the need to be “on” and respond right away, but I quickly got overwhelmed by the number of notifications and all the buzzing. The other major thing I do is that I set my phone to “do not disturb” starting at 10:30 pm and ending at 7:30 am! So, I take quite a few precautions because, over the years, I found myself just getting really distracted with my online life when there was an amazing real-life happening in front of me. It also kind of took my creativity and headspace away because I was so distracted.”

Hana Brannigan – Travel and mental health influencer

Put your phone away consciously

My Instagram account has been growing very fast since I started creating and posting content every day. Suddenly I got a lot of attention and, with it, external pressure increases. Because Instagram is almost like a full-time job, you always have to post and be active, so your numbers don’t drop. However, if you are not careful it can definitely influence you mentally. I found that taking time for yourself without your phone and putting it away consciously on a regular basis can be very helpful; enjoy moments with friends and family and have good conversations. The best thing to do is to not look at your phone in the morning, go for a workout and be productive offline first, instead.

Paul Pasytsch – Content creator and fitness model

Know your priorities

“When important deadlines approach academically, I naturally limit my time on social media however, never go cold turkey as I believe it will mess with the Instagram algorithm and stop your momentum. To find a balance I go to the gym and use that break as a time to be plugged only into my favorite music and focus on the present while going through my workout”.

Sergio Wynne – content creator

Be aware of who you follow

“My best tip to avoid social media burnout, especially if you use it as a platform for business growth and networking, is to make sure you set boundaries for when to be consuming and creating content, and to decide ahead of time how much time you will spend doing those activities. One rule I like to try to implement is to never spend more time consuming than I do create content. I also like to take one day off most weeks from creating and consuming content.

I have definitely had moments of feeling overwhelmed from social media. This past winter I deleted Instagram off of my phone for about a week and it was really refreshing. I honestly didn’t miss it and felt much more connected to my emotions and the people I was with. I think it’s an incredibly valuable platform, but it’s also addictive and it’s important to be conscious of that and take breaks when it becomes too much.

Another tip is to unfollow/mute anyone who is not adding positive value to your life. Once you “follow” someone, you really have very limited control of what and when they will pop up on your newsfeed and what emotions that might bring up for you. If you find yourself feeling bad, unhappy, upset, or like you are in a constant competition to someone you follow, it might be time to clean the house”.

Emily Louise – Online Entrepreneur, health and fitness expert.

Temporarily delete social apps

“To switch off from social media I just put my phone away and do something with my friends in the real world. I am studying to be a teacher and once when Instagram got to a point that became too much during my exams and it started to disrupt me, I made the decision to delete the app for a whole month. “

Florian Whitewalker – Model and content creator

Think before posting

“I don’t think I have ever got to a specific point where I have had to absolutely take a day or week off of Instagram or any social media channel. I realized I needed to make a change when I began attending events for bloggers/ influencers and I found myself scrolling through my own Instagram page to see how others were expecting me to be. This was a turning point for me. If I was having to look at my own social media pages to see how I should show up, I needed to make a change with how I used that platform.

So, rather than taking time off social media altogether, I decided to take more time to find myself. Instead of sitting on the couch scrolling, I would go for a walk or write. I needed to find a new way to show up online as myself – not with what would receive the most likes.

To most people’s surprise, I actually don’t spend much time on social media anymore. I always ask myself “why” every time I open an app. Am I posting something I am proud of? Am I getting on to look at content that will inspire and encourage me? If I find that I am only getting on because I am bored, or want to check the performance of a post, I step back.

I try not to check social media within the first hour of waking up. This helps to get my day started without distractions and to keep you focused on the tasks that are ahead. For me, spending that first hour planning out the day, connecting with myself, and easing into it all, truly helped my mental health for the better. And if social media is beginning to make me feel insecure, I immediately exit.”

Hannah Neese – Lifestyle Blogger

Conclusion: The key is to find a balance that works for you that helps clear up your headspace a bit for other things like being in the moment or being able to be creative.

#InfluencerMarketing #SocialMedia #ContentCreators

Why Influencer Marketing is here to stay 0 3121

Over the past months, you have probably heard arguments that Influencers are becoming ‘too much’ and that an invisible Influencer Marketing bubble is about to burst anytime soon.

The question though is, is it?

Well, unless your company doesn’t sell a product or service to humans, Influencer Marketing isn’t going anywhere, anytime soon.

Way before Instagram was launched with perfectly curated social media feeds becoming synonymous with high achieving content creators – and many decades before companies partnered with digital celebrities to tap into their social spheres with branded content – movie stars, top models and footballers were using their own names and acquired audiences to endorse products in paid collaborations. People didn’t have any idea about algorithms or ‘likes’, but from the moment the audience could recognize the person fronting a campaign – instead of simply a random person playing a character – the ‘influencer’ factor was switched on.

The main reason influencer marketing has been questioned lately is due to its transparency, authenticity, and the quality of influencers chosen to help push a campaign – something that has more to do with the capacity of in-house marketers and agencies to select the right brand ambassadors rather than with the efficiency of influencer marketing as a valuable tool.

It hasn’t stopped brands and agencies from heavily investing in content creators, though. In fact, Influencer marketing has continued to grow over the last few years, shifting from a respectable $1.7 billion industry in 2016 to an astonishing $6.5 – 8 billion segments in 2019, as reported by the American Influencer Council and Business Insider, respectively.

The statistics surrounding the booming influencer industry probably explains why 8 out of 10 marketing teams have a dedicated budget for influencer marketing this year, as per the 2019 State of Influencer Marketing Report, a global study conducted by Relatable.

Here are the five key reasons that back their decision.

It is scalable

Influencer Marketing is easily adaptable to almost any budget size or region. A recent report by Influencer Marketing Hub, an established Influencer marketing resource for brands and agencies, revealed that 57% of marketers believe that influencer marketing is a scalable tactic in their marketing ecosystem because if a brand wants to create a bigger campaign and target different regions they can alter their approach accordingly. For example, they would need to mainly focus on working with a greater number of influencers with larger followings, as long as they remain relevant to the company’s niche.

It has a higher Return On Investment (ROI)

Because in-house marketers and all agencies need to justify the money spent on any campaign, the so-called ROI (return on investment) remains at the forefront of the minds of most marketing professionals in 2019. However, a 2019 survey of marketers by Mediakix, an influencer marketing agency, shows that 89% of in-house marketers believe that the ROI from influencer marketing is comparable to, or better than, other marketing channels.

It can help to keep the conversation always on

A long time ago, when customers had a preferred outlet to get their daily dose of entertainment and information, it was easy to plan a campaign, target the platforms where your audience would most likely be hanging around and simply sit and wait for the results to come in. That technique no longer applies to any sector, with one-off campaigns becoming a risk too high to bet marketing budgets on. Due to their low costs, as well as their flexibility, “always on” influencer marketing campaigns have proved an effective way of keeping brand values and key messages in constant motion, leveraging long-term brand ambassador partnerships to keep a continuous and fresh stream of branded content.

It is a popular B2C tool

A study by inbound web marketing analytics and optimization agency Blue Corona found that, from over 800 marketing professionals and brand representatives surveyed, 69% of marketing professionals focus their influencer marketing campaigns on the B2C sector, with Instagram and Facebook leading the choices of most used social media channels for campaigns.

Reach new audiences

Besides helping to spread the news about a new campaign through word-of-mouth, sparking conversations about your product or brand amongst fans, Influencer Marketing campaigns also offer brands the opportunity to tap into the new audiences of content creators. Although some products are much more specific than others and one size doesn’t fit all, reaching a new audience beyond a company’s own social media channels will, at least, increase brand awareness.

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